The Seven Spiritual Laws Of Success Summary

1-Sentence-Summary: The Seven Spiritual Laws Of Success brings together the spiritual calmness and mindful behavior of Eastern religions with Western striving for achieving internal and external success, showing you seven specific ways to let both come to you.

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The Seven Spiritual Laws Of Success Summary

Deepak Chopra is one of the most well-known advocates of Eastern medicine and approaches to health and living in the Western world. He’s written over 80 books (!) a great deal of which have become bestsellers. To this day, The Seven Spiritual Laws Of Success remains his most popular one, having spent over a year on the NYT bestseller list.

He’s often featured in documentaries too, like Finding Joe, which is also where I first saw him. This book is about combining both Eastern and Western philosophy to arrive at a middle ground that’s the best of both worlds: calm, patient, confident about the future, yet not attached to outcomes or desperately struggling to get to your destination.

Here are my 3 favorite lessons:

  1. Be defenceless. Stop justifying yourself.
  2. Have strong, positive intentions to make what you want a reality.
  3. Just show up and serve the world and let your purpose find you, instead of fighting to find it.

Let’s look at how you can merge Eastern spirituality with Western drive, shall we?

Lesson 1: Accept your struggles, because the people who make your life difficult are here for a reason too.

Imagine you move to a new place. Apartments are expensive, so you decide to get a roommate to share rent with. For the first week, things go great. But then you start to discover little annoyances here and there and after two months, you’re really upset by some of your roommate’s behaviors.

For example, he might not clean his dishes after cooking and let them sit in the sink, or she might always tell you to take out the trash, but never take it out herself.

Of course this makes you frustrated, but there’s only one good solution here: accepting the situation and looking for the lesson it’s supposed to teach you.

Have you ever thought that even the people and events in that make your life more difficult might be there for a reason? Maybe you just haven’t learned to stand up for yourself enough, or not written enough, or not helped others enough.

Accepting where you are and not forcing your view of the world on others is what Deepak Chopra calls defencelessness. It’s the art of giving up the need to justify yourself and it’s very powerful, because it lets you move on much faster.

Lesson 2: Manifest your desires with intense, positive thoughts.

However, that doesn’t mean you should just let yourself get steamrolled whenever there’s a dispute. It just means you have to look for a different way of making your dreams come true. Instead of arguing where the world throws negativity at you and trying to flip it, why not direct your positive intentions forward in those areas of life that really matter?

You’ve surely witnessed the power of a self-fulfilling prophecy firsthand. You told yourself you’d do great at something, you walked in with confidence – and then you did kick ass.

This is the power of positive thinking, and it works for one simple reason: it programs your actions subconsciously, by getting you in the right mindset.

For example, if you’re stuck in that roommate situation from above, you could then proceed to pick out all the things that are wrong with your apartment and your living situation, thinking about how you want to move, but can’t afford a place on your own. Or, you could be grateful for having a place to live for now and instead focus your energy on getting an even better place, for example by thinking about what you want your next apartment to look like.

The universe has a funny way of working out, but in essence, you’ll most often get back the same kind of energy you put in. You give negative energy, you get negative energy back. You give positive energy, you’ll get back more positivity.

Lesson 3: Let your life’s purpose find you, instead of desperately struggling to find it.

This is one of the lessons that couldn’t be closer to my heart at the time I’m writing it. Just two days ago, I had a huge mental shift. For weeks I’ve been working on and preparing the launch of a product based on the content I’ve created all year long. But something didn’t feel right. And then I realized: I want to be a full-time writer, but not at all cost.

I don’t want to create products, just for the sake of having products. I want to create things of real value. And if at some point, what I do allows me to keep on writing full-time, because it happens to pay the bills, then great! If not, that’s okay too.

Ask the universe what you can do for it, not what it can do for you.

Don’t try to desperately force yourself into a certain purpose and then that purpose upon the world. Take a look at yourself. Where are you right now? What can you actually do? Where can you give help? Where can you create value?

And then let the rest fall into place. Once you start waking up excited every day and seem to have endless energy to get things done, that’s when you know you’ve found it.

My personal take-aways

These laws aren’t complicated. But they don’t exactly feel simple either. I think that’s because they pull from two opposing sides. And while that makes them not quite easy to fully embrace, it’s also what makes them so very powerful. If you’re hungry, if you want to achieve big things, but feel your impatience is sometimes hurting you in the process, this is for you.

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What else can you learn from the blinks?

  • How to dissolve your ego and why it helps you find your true self
  • What defencelessness looks like in action
  • Why the fastest way to reaching your desires is to let go of them
  • The reason you shouldn’t hoard your money
  • Why conscious choice making matters

Who would I recommend The Seven Spiritual Laws Of Success summary to?

The 21 year old college student, who’s unhappy with her roommates, the 53 year old bus driver, who spends most of his day complaining about his passengers, and anyone who’s really frustrated that they haven’t found their purpose in life yet.